African travel influencer – We Are Africa http://we-are-africa.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 17:35:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://we-are-africa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png African travel influencer – We Are Africa http://we-are-africa.org/ 32 32 BBC’s ‘Racism for Sale’ Documentary Sparks Discussions, Censorship on Chinese Social Media https://we-are-africa.org/bbcs-racism-for-sale-documentary-sparks-discussions-censorship-on-chinese-social-media/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:05:10 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/bbcs-racism-for-sale-documentary-sparks-discussions-censorship-on-chinese-social-media/ China’s withdrawal as host of the 2023 Asian Cup leaves netizens wondering, “Will these newly built stadiums become Covid quarantine hubs instead?” These are the ten stages which not be used for next year’s Asian Cup. NOTThe news that China will no longer host the 2023 Asian Cup due to the Covid situation has left […]]]>

China’s withdrawal as host of the 2023 Asian Cup leaves netizens wondering, “Will these newly built stadiums become Covid quarantine hubs instead?” These are the ten stages which not be used for next year’s Asian Cup.

NOTThe news that China will no longer host the 2023 Asian Cup due to the Covid situation has left Chinese netizens wondering what will happen to the mega venues built specifically for the event.

On Saturday May 14, the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) issued a statement stating that following lengthy discussions with the Chinese Football Association (CFA), it had been informed by the CFA that it would not be able to host the 2023 AFC Asian Cup. due to the circumstances caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The event was scheduled to take place from June 16 to July 16, 2023 in ten Chinese cities: Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, Chongqing, Chengdu, Xi’an, Dalian, Qingdao, Xiamen and Suzhou.

On Weibo, a popular article listed ten stadiums that have been renovated or newly built to host the 2023 Asian Cup, adding the alleged (mind-blowing) construction/renovation costs.

1. Xiamen Bailu Stadium: costs 3.5 billion [$515.5 million].
2. Qingdao Youth Football Stadium: costs 3.2 billion [$470 million].
3. Chongqing Longxing Stadium: costs 2.7 billion [$397.7 million].
4. Xi’an International Football Center: costs 2.395 billion [$352.7 million].
5. Dalian Suoyuwan Football Stadium: costs 1.88 billion [$277 million].
6. Chengdu Phoenix Hill Stadium: costs 1.865 billion [$274.7 million].
7. SAIC Motor Pudong Arena: costs 1.807 billion [$266 million].
8. Suzhou Kunshan Football Stadium: Costs 1.6 billion [$235.6 million].
9. Tianjin Binhai Football Stadium: the renovation cost 320 million [$47 million].
10. New Gongti Stadium in Beijing: the renovation cost 280 million [$41.2 million].

All of these stadiums were built or renovated for the Asian Cup on a tight schedule, as there was only a three-year lead time from design to completion of construction. In the summer of 2019, it was confirmed that China would host the Asian Cup.

Now that these venues will no longer be used for the Asian Cup, many netizens are wondering what will happen to them.

One of the most popular answers to this question was, “Maybe they should be turned into makeshift hospitals [fangcang].”

Fangcang, China’s makeshift “square cabin” hospitals, are seen as a key solution in China’s fight against the virus. With mass testing and local lockdowns, Fangcang has become an important phenomenon in China’s dynamic zero-Covid policy.

Since every city needs quarantine places to prepare for a possible local outbreak, many people half-joke that the sites would be more useful as Covid isolation points if they are not in use anyway for the Asian Cup.

“So many big stadiums, what a waste,” write some commentators, with others suggesting stadiums should be open for people to use and enjoy.

In response to China’s withdrawal as host of the 2023 Asian Cup, another popular comment said, “China has taken the lead in reaching Zero in major sporting events”, jokingly referring to the country’s Zero-Covid policy which is currently impacting all aspects of society.

For others, the announcement that China would not host the Asian Cup came as a shock. Not necessarily because of the cancellation of the event itself, but because it made them realize that China’s strict measures and the Zero-Covid policy should continue until 2023: “How is did we get there? I thought the country would open up after the general assembly,” one person wrote, referring to the National Communist Party Congress which is scheduled for fall 2022.

Another Weibo user wrote, “They finally said it. The Asian Cup will be hosted by another country because our strong country will continue to remain closed, the money spent on building all these venues is going to be wasted.

“The point many people missed is that the Asian Cup is no longer held in China because China refuses to hold the event in ‘fully open mode’ as requested by foreign countries,” wrote another commentator. Some people hailed the decision, calling it “courageous” for China to persist in handling the pandemic in its own way.

Others hope that all the money spent on the venues will not be wasted and that China can use these venues to host the World Cup in the future.

Below is the list of ten new venues where the Asian Cup will not take place.

1. Xiamen Bailu Stadium (厦门白鹭体育场)

Bailu Stadium in Xiamen is an impressive construction with a steel structure similar to Beijing’s Bird’s Nest and like most of the stadiums on this list, it was designed especially for the 2023 Asian Cup.

Scheduled to be completed by the end of 2022, the building not only offers a beautiful sea view, it is also fully multifunctional and has a floor area of ​​180,600 square meters and a capacity of 60,000 seats. It is the first professional football stadium in China that can change from a football field to a sports field. The inner and outer circles of the seating area can be moved around to transform the stadium.

2. Qingdao Youth Football Stadium (青岛青春足球场)

Qingdao Youth Football Stadium, a high-level football stadium with a capacity of 50,000, is the first major professional football stadium in Shandong Province.

The stadium, located in the city’s Chengyang district, began construction in 2020, and the entire stadium with an area of ​​163,395 square meters is expected to be completed by the end of 2022.

3. Chongqing Longxing Stadium (重庆龙兴体育场)

Like most of the other stadiums on this list, Chongqing Longxing Stadium started construction in 2020, and the 60,000 capacity football stadium is expected to be completed in December 2022.

The design of the stadium is based on a twirling flame, intended to convey the hot image of Chongqing (the hotpot city) and the burning passion of Asian Cup football. Aerial photos released by state media in March 2022 show that construction of the roof and decorations has reached the final stage.

4. Xi’an International Football Center (西安国际足球中心)

The Xi’an International Football Center is a project by Zaha Hadid, which is the same architectural firm to design prestigious buildings in China such as Beijing Daxing International Airport or the Galaxy SOHO.

On their site, they write that the football center, the construction of which began in 2020, is a 60,000-seater stadium in the new district of Xi’ans Fengdong. Besides the arena, the stadium will also provide recreational spaces for the city.

5. Dalian Suoyuwan Football Stadium (大连梭鱼湾足球场)

Located on Dalian Bay, this is a spectacular new 63,000-seater stadium which was obviously set to host the AFC Asian Cup in 2023 and be home to Dalian Professional Football Club.

An animation of the Dalian Football Stadium design can be viewed here.

6. Chengdu Phoenix Hill Stadium (成都凤凰山体育场)

Chengdu Phoenix Hill Stadium consists of a 60,000-seat stadium and an 18,000-seat standard arena. The large open-cable dome structure is said to be the first of its kind in China.

Besides football, the site will also be able to host other major tournaments, including ice hockey, badminton, table tennis, handball and gymnastics.

7. SAIC Motor Pudong Arena (上汽浦东足球场)

Shanghai Pudong Football Stadium, currently named SAIC Motor Pudong Arena, was supposed to be one of the stadiums used for the AFC Asian Cup, but it was not necessarily built for this purpose.

The 33,765-seater stadium, which is supposed to remind you of a Chinese porcelain bowl, is home to football association Shanghai Port FC and was the first club-designated dedicated football stadium in China. Its construction, started in 2018, was completed at the end of 2020.

8. Suzhou Kunshan Football Stadium (苏州昆山足球场)

Suzhou Kunshan Football Stadium is Jiangsu’s first professional football stadium. With a total construction area of ​​135,000 square meters, the stadium can accommodate around 45,000 spectators.

The design of the building is inspired by the traditional Chinese “folding fan”. Other photos of the place can be seen here.

9. Tianjin Binhai Football Stadium (天津滨海足球场)

The TEDA Football Stadium in Tianjin has been completely renovated and upgraded to host the 2023 Asian Cup. The stadium, built in 2004, originally accommodated 37,450 people. Renovations to the original stadium began this year and the construction work was expected to take around six months.

ten . Beijing New Gongti Stadium (新北京工体)

The former Beijing Workers’ Stadium or Gongti was closed in 2020 to be renovated and reopened in December 2022, in time for the 2023 AFC Asian Cup. The Pekingese reported on the venue’s renovation process, with the stadium’s capacity increasing to 68,000, with the venue benefiting from an all-new roof structure.

For more articles on Covid-19 related topics on Chinese social media, click here.

For more articles on hot topics related to architecture in China, click here.

By Manya Koetse

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Kofi Annan, Nkrumah, 15 Other Great Africans Who Had African Names https://we-are-africa.org/kofi-annan-nkrumah-15-other-great-africans-who-had-african-names/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 15:56:08 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/kofi-annan-nkrumah-15-other-great-africans-who-had-african-names/ He cited Kofi Annan, Ras Tafari Makonnen, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Wole Soyinka, Emeka Anyaoku, Bayo Ogunlesi, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Sade Adu, Ali Mazrui, Barack Obama, Aliko Dangote, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Fela Kuti, Chiwetel Ejiofo and Dele Olojede who became global icons but did not give up African names for Europeans. “The greatest Africans on […]]]>

He cited Kofi Annan, Ras Tafari Makonnen, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Wole Soyinka, Emeka Anyaoku, Bayo Ogunlesi, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Sade Adu, Ali Mazrui, Barack Obama, Aliko Dangote, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Fela Kuti, Chiwetel Ejiofo and Dele Olojede who became global icons but did not give up African names for Europeans.

“The greatest Africans on planet Earth have become great with their black African names. Imitate them. Don’t be a black man with a European name. Give your children African names”, Omokri wrote on the Facebook page of Build Up Nigeria, a group he founded.

According to him, he traveled to many countries of the world and discovered that Africans are losing their identity due to the penchant for taking European and other continents names and practicing their cultures.

“I have traveled extensively and Africans are the only ones I know who take pride in speaking a foreign language with a perfect accent, even when they don’t speak their native language. Keep your culture alive. “Speak your language at your children. That doesn’t make them local. It makes them vocal!” he pleaded.

Recently, Omokri advised kind people to stop helping poor men who are married and have many children.

He felt that these men need to suffer, so that others who see them suffer will learn not to have children they cannot care for.

According to him, the continued extension of a helping hand to poor married men who have many children will make them have the mentality that they are free to give birth to as many children as they wish, and God will use the people to help them. take care of them.

Omokri was not entirely against people helping others in need, but according to him, help should not be because the recipient has many dependent children.

“Stop justifying helping a poor man because he has a wife and many children. Let him suffer! Such a man needs to suffer, so that others see him suffer and learn not to have pain. kids they can’t take care of. Or we’ll have MORE in society, if you help them.

“If you continue to help men just because they are poor and have many children, their mentality will be: born as you wish, God will use people to help you train them. Your ‘ goodness’ feeds this mentality and creates a population explosion leading to insecurity!” Omokri wrote on his Twitter page on Wednesday, May 18.

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Warning: Put these 9 South African beauty influencers on your radar now! https://we-are-africa.org/warning-put-these-9-south-african-beauty-influencers-on-your-radar-now/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:13:24 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/warning-put-these-9-south-african-beauty-influencers-on-your-radar-now/ South Africa is home to incredibly talented people who always stand out in their field, locally and internationally. If we try to name all of these talents, we might end up with an endless post. So today we are going to shed light on the world influencing the beauty of Rainbow nation. Most of these […]]]>

South Africa is home to incredibly talented people who always stand out in their field, locally and internationally. If we try to name all of these talents, we might end up with an endless post. So today we are going to shed light on the world influencing the beauty of Rainbow nation.

Most of these beauty influencers have a massive following on social media. We can see why fans love seeing their posts, as they offer lots of makeup and hair tips and tricks, as well as game-changing product recommendations. Capitalizing on their online success, many have launched beauty brands and delved into the world of fashion and lifestyle.

Without further ado, we’ve compiled a list of nine South African beauty influencers you’ll want to check out sooner rather than later. Good scrolling.

Visit www.bellanaijastyle.com to stay up to date with the latest trends in African fashion and lifestyle.

Mihlali Ndamase

@mihlalii_n

Who? Multi-award winning Content Creator, Vlogger, Makeup Artist and Social Media Influencer. Founder of the innovative beauty platform Malakyt.

Ffollow for: Quick and convenient makeup demos on Youtube, endlessly imaginative beauty looks and hacks that will motivate you to be more creative, lifestyle content and more.

Lungile Thabethe

@lungilethabethe

Who? Celebrity makeup artist and beauty entrepreneur. Founder of an online retail interior design studio Glaze Home and co-founder of the beauty brand Quick face.

Follow for: Endless makeup inspiration that balances wow with wearable, useful product recommendations and aesthetically pleasing travel and home decor snaps.

Cynthia Gwebu

@cgwebuofficial

Who? Digital designer, beauty and lifestyle YouTuber.

Follow for: A nice mix of his professional work, including great product recommendations and industry insights, as well as sweeping views on his account.

Vongai Mapho

@vongai.mapho

Who? Digital designer, beauty and lifestyle YouTuber. Founder of an online fashion brand Dream clothes.

Follow for: In-depth, trusted, and unbiased product reviews, plus practical makeup and skincare tips and tricks.

Mbali Mkhize

@mbalimkh_

Who? Beauty and lifestyle youtuber and social media influencer.

Follow for: Flawless makeup creations, endless styling and makeup inspiration.

Kay Ngonyama

@kay.yarms

Who? Makeup artist, beauty influencer and YouTuber.

Follow for: Endless makeup and hair inspiration, Beauty’s Feed is a positive place to be a testament to her fun personality.

Nuzhah Jacobs

@nuzhahjacobs

Who? Beauty and hair content creator

Follow for: The ultimate beauty and natural hair education, from insights into the best makeup and hair products to out-of-this-world makeup creations.

Thandi Gama

@thandigama

Who? Makeup artist, beauty influencer and YouTuber.

Follow for: A fun and relevant feed, with lots of product recommendations (some sponsored, some not) and compelling makeup tutorials.

Yolenda Jawe

@yolzchannel

Who? Award-winning content creator, beauty and lifestyle, and the force behind skincare brand cruelty Yolz beauty.

Follow for: Unlimited natural hair inspiration, lifestyle, fitness and bubbly personality.

Can’t find your favorite South African beauty influencer on this list? Tag them below!

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Why this book startup is taking a page from Glossier and Allbirds https://we-are-africa.org/why-this-book-startup-is-taking-a-page-from-glossier-and-allbirds/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:00:06 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/why-this-book-startup-is-taking-a-page-from-glossier-and-allbirds/ Every year, publishers release thousands of new titles, but the vast majority don’t make a profit. Most authors spend years working on a book, only to see it languish, unable to find an audience. Amy Snook thinks there’s a better way. She just launched a new publishing house called Parea whose goal is to publish […]]]>

Every year, publishers release thousands of new titles, but the vast majority don’t make a profit. Most authors spend years working on a book, only to see it languish, unable to find an audience.

Amy Snook thinks there’s a better way. She just launched a new publishing house called Parea whose goal is to publish books by new authors and then help find an audience by targeting the influencers and communities that each title will resonate with. It’s the latest effort to shake up a sleepy, old-fashioned industry.

Amy Snook [Photo: Parea Books]

Snook has spent his career thinking about how to use the internet to help brands find consumers. She was one of the first employees of makeup brand Glossier before taking on the role of COO of alcohol brand Haus. Either way, his job was to use social media to find and create passionate communities. Amid building these businesses, Snook has always had his head in a book. “I’ve always been a voracious reader, but I couldn’t help but notice that the publishing industry works so differently from modern brands,” she says. “It seemed like most of the books never found an audience, which seems like such a waste of resources.”

Today, the industry is dominated by five major publishers that have been in operation for over a century: Penguin Random House, Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster and Macmillan. (That will shrink to four if Penguin Random House’s acquisition of Simon & Schuster goes through.) Although these companies publish thousands of books each year, they’re building their business around a few bestsellers that will sell millions of books. copies and will help pay for everything else. . While publishers invest a lot of money in marketing the books they hope will be hits, they invest very few resources in smaller books or by unknown authors. “Authors are expected to market books themselves,” Snook explains, “which is why publishers tend to favor writers with an embedded audience, like celebrities. But many authors lack the skills to market their own books.

Snook’s business model, on the other hand, begins by identifying communities of readers that are currently underserved. While the person most likely to read a book is a black female college graduate, black female authors are still underrepresented, despite a string of recent books by these authors. Of the first six books Parea has under contract, four are written by black women.

[Photo: Parea Books]

Snook also focuses on the category of “self-help” (or in his words “self-expanding”), which tends to generate a lot of bestsellers. She defines these books as nonfiction that helps readers think about a problem or learn something new. The first book, The hours before dusk, is by sustainability journalist Jenna Matecki, who profiles 25 different cities and challenges readers to find joy in their daily experience of city life. The second book on the record is written by an African-American death doula; the third is from a black hotelier in Morocco. To edit the books, Snook tapped Alyea Canada, who has spent her career editing books for independent presses and was until recently the editor of an online literary magazine. Asymptote log.

When Snook begins work on a book, she reaches out to a community of readers she thinks might be a good fit for the title. With Matecki’s book, Snook scoured TikTok, Instagram and popular reading blogs for book influencers who love travel and cities, giving them early drafts of the manuscript and inviting them to provide feedback, which has sometimes leads to changes in the manuscript. The idea is to help influencers feel invested in the success of the book.

She then works with those influencers to get their communities excited about a new release. The hours before dusk officially releases in August and has already sold several thousand pre-order copies. Snook considers this a success because most newbie authors only sell 2,000 copies in total. Parea’s books will primarily be available on the brand’s website, although Snook is partnering with select retailers that may reach the target audience. And while Snook won’t pay authors upfront, they will receive 20% royalties on each book, double the industry standard.

Snook uses a playbook similar to how DTC startups often create trails. Glossier, for example, reached out to beauty influencers (and their followers) who would understand the brand’s minimalist, natural aesthetic and help garner pre-launch support. The brand has gained millions of followers on its social media accounts, enabling it to sell directly to its community.

Jane Friedman, a publishing analyst with more than three decades of industry experience, agrees that publishers tend to focus their attention on a few titles that they believe will sell well. But they also hope there will be some surprise hits. The problem is that, historically, a few influential gatekeepers are tasked with “discovering” new authors or hidden gems. “The DNA of traditional book publishing is that it caters to tastemakers – like librarians, booksellers and book reviewers at big publications like the New York Times,said Friedman. “And unlike other consumer companies like Coke and Maybelline, publishers don’t do rigorous, systematic market research. Publishers don’t really seem to care what readers want; they’re guided by the instinct of editors and keepers.

Traditional publishers have started to understand the power of Instagram and TikTok, and some imprints have marketing teams reaching out to TikTok influencers to promote new releases. But given the sheer volume of books, it’s still impossible for all titles to get equal billing. Snook wants every book in her portfolio to grab attention, which is admittedly easier since, to begin with, she only publishes a dozen books a year. And Snook isn’t the only one trying to shake up book publishing. Over the past few years, other startups have tried to find creative new ways to market books. Zando, for example, was founded in 2020 by former Crown editor Molly Stern. Stern does not primarily rely on bookstores and advertising to market new books, but instead partners with celebrities and brands to promote the books to their fans and customers. Zibby Books, founded last year by book influencer Zibby Owens, will publish non-fiction and memoirs from a variety of voices. Owens has developed a unique way of compensating authors and employees, dividing 75% of all net profits each calendar year between each employee and author (in addition to paying them traditional royalties and advances). This financial structure is designed to allow all authors to benefit equally.

Friedman thinks it’s a good thing that new independent publishers are coming up with creative ways to help beginning writers emerge. But for now, these startups are still small and probably can’t affect a broader shift in the industry. “The question is, can this be scaled?” she says. “That’s where the rubber hits the road.” Friedman points to public relations firm Open Road Media, which focuses on publicity for new books, as something that has the potential to be more disruptive. “They’ve created a digital marketing engine that’s exactly what big publishers need to market their books at scale, which seems a lot more interesting and sustainable,” she says.

Snook realizes she’s starting small, but she believes Parea and the other startups in this space have the power to pressure the bigger players to change the way they operate. And ultimately, it gives readers more opportunities to find talented authors and great books. “I hope traditional publishing looks at this and realizes that it missed something by not trying to understand who its readers are, what they want, and how to engage them in the acquisition process and marketing books,” she says. “I don’t believe publishing is a zero-sum game. If more of the world reads more often, we’ll be in a much better place.

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From Zimbabwe to New Zealand to Texas: Atipa is Living the American College Dream https://we-are-africa.org/from-zimbabwe-to-new-zealand-to-texas-atipa-is-living-the-american-college-dream/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 03:14:06 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/from-zimbabwe-to-new-zealand-to-texas-atipa-is-living-the-american-college-dream/ By stuff.co.nz The number of talented Kiwi sports kids coming to the United States on college scholarships is growing every year, and Southland provides glowing examples. Logan Savory reports. Atipa Mabonga’s parents signed her up for almost every available sport when she was a child. It wasn’t so much the sport itself, there were other […]]]>

By stuff.co.nz


The number of talented Kiwi sports kids coming to the United States on college scholarships is growing every year, and Southland provides glowing examples. Logan Savory reports.

Atipa Mabonga’s parents signed her up for almost every available sport when she was a child.

It wasn’t so much the sport itself, there were other reasons.

Almost 20 years ago, the Mabonga family left Zimbabwe for New Zealand for a new life.

Atipa was four years old at the time.

Atipa Mabonga with her parents Edwin. and Fungi. [File photo].

First stop was Opunake, Taranaki, then Riversdale, Southland before finally finding their home across the province in Otautau.

Mabonga was around eight years old when she joined athletics at Southland.

She was part of the small Otautau Athletics Club in western Southland.

“Mom and dad signed us up because the best way to learn about a new culture is through sports and food.

“Sport was a great way to meet people.”

At this point, athletics was more about seeing New Zealand than the world.

“It was a great way to travel. My brother and I have been to every Colgate Games, literally from the age of five until about 12 years old.

“I never had any pressure from my parents to play. It was really out of love.”

Atipa Mabonga competing in the women's under-18 long jump at the Australian Junior Championships in Athletics at Sydney Olympic Park in 2015.

Atipa Mabonga competing in the women’s under-18 long jump at the Australian Junior Championships in Athletics at Sydney Olympic Park in 2015.

But sometimes in the joy of sport emerges an obvious talent.

During Mabonga’s time at Central Southland College, she established herself as one of the most talented young high jumpers in the country. She excelled, especially in the triple jump.

During this evolution as a promising athlete, Mabonga trained alongside another Southland triple jump star, Greer Alsop, under the tutelage of Lance Smith.

Alsop ended up moving to the United States in 2014 on a college scholarship. She attended Washington State University.

Another Southland triple jumper, Charlotte Muschamp, also attended Washington State University, while runner Jordan Rackham went to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Before that, runner Christina Taylor headed to the University of Denton in Texas.

This sparked a lot of intrigue for Mabonga.

“I thought, ‘Oh my God, what is this? It’s like a whole other world,’ she recalls the idea of ​​living, studying and competing in the States -United.

In Year 12 at Central Southland College, the thinking started to get serious for Mabonga. Offers started coming in from colleges.

Eventually, the kid from Otautau signed with Southern Methodist University [SMU].

Mabonga says she would be lying if she said she wasn’t nervous when she put pen to paper and committed to living in Dallas, Texas in 2017.

“I remember mom saying, you can give it a year and if you hate it, you can go home.”

“My mum and dad had taken the plunge to move from Zimbabwe to New Zealand, so I thought, ‘if they can do it, and establish a successful life here, I can do it’.”

Five years later, the 23-year-old describes the opportunity as life changing. She is living the American dream and has never looked back.

Atipa Mabonga is now working with the Kansas Chiefs NFL team in the United States.

Atipa Mabonga is now working with the Kansas Chiefs NFL team in the United States.

She established herself as a popular member of the [SMU] athletics team.

In 2018, she was named SMU’s field team MVP and won an academic award while on the team.

In 2020, Mabonga won the Jerry LeVias Outstanding Athlete Award, designed to honor an African-American student-athlete who exemplifies excellence on and off the court.

But his impact during his four years at SMU extended beyond that. She took every available opportunity and became a leader. There is proof.

In 2020, she co-founded the Black Student Athlete Committee [BSAC] at EMS.

She says a lot of it is about making sure people of color are heard and providing support where needed.

Although he finished at SMU in 2021, Mabonga remains a director of BSAC. She is proud of the work accomplished.

Mabonga is now employed by the Kansas City Chiefs NFL organization in a sought-after role.

She joined the organization last year in a seasonal position as a social media assistant for the NFL Giant.

However, the Chiefs have decided to offer a full-time position as an influencer and culture coordinator.

It’s a big role, but in short, she works to help build the player and team brand, not just in the United States but around the world.

“It’s an honor to be entrusted with such a large part of the Chiefs brand at such a young age and so early in my career.”

For now, she’s chosen to put her own athletic quests on hold, opting instead to give her body a break.

Mabonga traveled to the United States with sports at the center of her attention, but took much more advantage of the scholarship opportunity.

Mabonga will always be grateful to where sport has taken her in life.

“It was definitely one of the most impactful things I’ve ever done. I would do it again,” she says of the American college experience.

“It’s a lot of work and it’s not easy. It’s a full-time commitment, mind, body and soul.

“But for me, I’ve grown so much as an athlete, but also as a person. I’m just eternally grateful to the coaches who recruited me.

“SMU will always be special to me because that’s where I think I blossomed into who I am today.”

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Check out the 9 Kenyan fashion influencers on the rise https://we-are-africa.org/check-out-the-9-kenyan-fashion-influencers-on-the-rise/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 12:00:43 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/check-out-the-9-kenyan-fashion-influencers-on-the-rise/ In the digital age, social media has opened up the world to major fashion influencers from across the continent and around the world. The Kenyan influencer space has followed digital trends and standards as various opportunities continue to arise. Thanks to the growing number of Kenyan fashion influencers, from Instagram creators to growing YouTubers and […]]]>

In the digital age, social media has opened up the world to major fashion influencers from across the continent and around the world. The Kenyan influencer space has followed digital trends and standards as various opportunities continue to arise.

Thanks to the growing number of Kenyan fashion influencers, from Instagram creators to growing YouTubers and TikTokers; we get a glimpse of how they showcase their aesthetic with their distinctive styles.

Now, if you’re looking for your next fashion inspiration, you’ve come to the right place, as we’ve carefully selected these fascinating Kenyan influencers that you should consider seeking out.

Amber Ray

Amber Ray is a Kenyan content creator, YouTuber and brand ambassador with 1.9 million Instagram followers. Her style choices range from bold prints and exciting cutouts that accentuate her curves and enviable figure. So if you’re a curvy #BellaStylista looking for curvy girl fashion, Amber is your catch.

Akothee Kenya

Esther Akothcommonly called Akothea, is a Kenyan artist, entrepreneur and influencer. She is the founder of Akothee Safaris, a Kenya-based travel agency, the Akothee Foundation, a charity, and Aknotela and Akothee Homes, a real estate company. Her style is simple, yet fashion forward as she draws inspiration from her heritage.

Terryanne Chebet

Media personality, entrepreneur and influencer, Terryanne Chebet is one of Kenya’s biggest media personalities with over 700,000 Instagram followers. Its content covers tips and knowledge on fashion, beauty and lifestyle. Her page also features easy-chic looks and workwear inspiration to channel if you’re that type of guy. #BellaStylista.

DJ Sadic

As his professional name suggests, Sadistic DJ is a disc jockey, fashion, music and fitness content creator. As well as creating amazing music, he creates and shares super helpful fitness and style tips, including workwear and activewear to help men evolve their sense of style and well-being. .

Maureen Waititu

Maureen Waititu is a television host, YouTuber, lawyer and stylish content creator. Maureen is this super stylish villain who’s not afraid to play with bold prints, patterns and colors via her aesthetic. You would mostly see Maureen wearing looks that celebrate her phenomenal figure and elevate her whole image.

@maureenwaititu

Sharon Mundia

Creator of style, beauty and lifestyle content, Sharon Mundia is your go-to for colorful, easy and tasteful dresses and a loungewear aesthetic. Whether she’s visiting scenic destinations with enviable looks or rocking great casual workwear, Sharon is that #BellaStylista who will inspire you to be the most fashionable.

NINI NANA OWITI

Brand influencer and digital content creator, Nini Nana Owiti is it sporty nasty that combines glamor and athleisure chic. From bodycon dresses, gorgeous African prints, to airport looks and loungewear, Nini effortlessly styles and combines these themes into polished executions and her Instagram page is an elegant reception to it.

Bridget Shighadi

Kenyan actor Brigitte Shigadi may steal hearts on screen, but her aesthetic and fashion game on her Instagram take her artistry to a whole new level. From gorgeous printed kaftans to head-turning looks, this queen knows how to give us and her fans the style content we need when she’s not on set. To disagree? check out his Instagram page.

Mr Xabib

Mr Xabib is a Kenyan model, actor and menswear content creator whose work spans mens workwear, street style, travel and casual looks. Be sure to visit her Instagram page as her content is sure to inspire you for your next outing or trip.

The fun doesn’t stop there, visit www.bellanaijastyle.com to learn more about African fashion and lifestyle now!

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Why Black British Women Feel More Beautiful Abroad https://we-are-africa.org/why-black-british-women-feel-more-beautiful-abroad/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 16:54:00 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/why-black-british-women-feel-more-beautiful-abroad/ “Even though I have traveled to places like Bali, Portugal and Brazil, I have only traveled to two majority black countries, Nigeria and Ghana. I was in Nigeria for almost two months – I am went to the mainland, to Abuja, then I went to Benin where my father is from – and I felt […]]]>
“Even though I have traveled to places like Bali, Portugal and Brazil, I have only traveled to two majority black countries, Nigeria and Ghana. I was in Nigeria for almost two months – I am went to the mainland, to Abuja, then I went to Benin where my father is from – and I felt like I lived there. One of the first things that struck me was that I didn’t never had to explain how to pronounce my name. That was huge! I’m half Edo, half Yoruba, and Oghosa is an Edo name and is actually pronounced “o-wa-sa”. In terms of functionality and colorism, it was very refreshing to think, wow, I was lied to [about beauty], including this idea of ​​the stereotypical black female body shape. In Nigeria, all the women looked different. They all have different morphologies and many women look like me. There is only one mixture. I always felt like living in England that I had to live up to that ideal figure-of-eight physique with a big behind and a small waist; this ridiculous idea of ​​what a black woman is is supposed to look like. My visit really underscored that we are not a monolith and that there is not a single look that is worthy of being desirable.
“England can sometimes make you feel a little ignored. Not all the time. But sometimes. [Travelling to Nigeria] was good at showing me that black women can be the main character. The trip certainly made me feel more connected to my culture, but [in] a majority black country in general, there is a sense of peace that we really should experience everyday. Obviously you still have the ramifications of colonialism in Nigeria, but the effects of white supremacy, those little things that you have to deal with every day in the UK – the microaggressions, the stares, the ‘How do you pronounce your first name? – you just don’t have to worry about it [in a Black majority country]. There is a sense of peace and belonging that emerges when you travel to these countries. It’s a shame it’s so expensive because I would do it all the time.
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Scorpions take Gambia to victory in first CAN23 qualifier https://we-are-africa.org/scorpions-take-gambia-to-victory-in-first-can23-qualifier/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 13:50:57 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/scorpions-take-gambia-to-victory-in-first-can23-qualifier/ Published on: 06/05/2022 – 15:50 After a fantastic run at the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations, Gambia’s Scorpions kick off their AFCON 2023 campaign with victory over South Sudan’s Bright Stars at the Lat-Dior stadium in Thiès, Senegal, on Saturday night. Abdul Jallow’s goal after 45 minutes was enough to secure victory for the Scorpions. […]]]>

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After a fantastic run at the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations, Gambia’s Scorpions kick off their AFCON 2023 campaign with victory over South Sudan’s Bright Stars at the Lat-Dior stadium in Thiès, Senegal, on Saturday night.

Abdul Jallow’s goal after 45 minutes was enough to secure victory for the Scorpions.

“We felt pressure because we want to qualify for the next AFCON, we don’t want to be like the other teams who will make the first impression and wait years before they can qualify again,” said the new captain. Gambian Omar Colley.

Colley took over the captaincy role from retired captain Pa Modou Jagne shortly after CAN21 led the Gambia side to their maiden victory.

Post-match reaction

As many fans celebrated the win, coach Tom Saintfiet said it was too early to call his team favourites.

“It’s a good first win but we have to respect our opponents and not see ourselves as favorites because on paper Mali and Congo are the favourites,” Saintfiet said after the game, referring to their next match against Congo next week.

This is only the first of six games, where the Scorpions will face Mali, one of the favorites.

South Sudan, who have never qualified for the continental showpiece, hope to qualify for the tournament despite Saturday night’s loss.

“When we came into this game we knew it would be a tough game, everyone says Mali and Congo are the favourites, but for me I think Gambia are one of the favourites,” he said. said South Sudan coach Stefano Cusin.

“We will go back and see what we can get from Mali – hopefully a win,” he added.

Banjul stadium banned by CAF

The Scorpions were unable to play at home following a decision by CAF to ban the independent Bakau Stadium from hosting the game as it was “not fit” to stage international matches. The stadium is the only international facility in The Gambia, built in 1983, and has never undergone major maintenance.

Some 3,000 die-hard Scorpions fans traveled to Senegal to watch their side play, but were frustrated at having to travel seven hours to see their side play.

“It’s a shame that we had to travel for almost seven hours to watch a game that was supposed to be played on our ground, and I still have to travel 7 hours back to get home,” said Jakaria, who maintained with RFI. after the game.

He celebrated their victory, but admitted it was bittersweet.

“Look how our players fared at AFCON,” he said, referring to the Scorpions advancing to the quarter-finals, even though it was their first time in the continent-wide tournament.

“If we’re a serious country, it’s time they thought about investing more in sport,” he added.

Fan and social media influencer Tida Jobe, who organized the ‘bring our boy back’ protest when the Gambia team were delayed in Cameroon after their AFCON 2021 quarter-final exit, has shared her frustration.

“We all came here because our players really try and every time we watch them it makes us proud, but the authorities don’t help,” she said.

Gambia’s Scorpions had to play in Thies, Senegal against South Sudan’s Bright Stars for the AFCON qualifiers as their stadium in Banjul was not deemed suitable for use. © RFI/Sally Jeng

“Imagine if we had played this game at home and the support these boys would have received! We will never stop speaking up and making sure they have better facilities,” she added.

The Gambian team will travel to Congo and play their second match of the qualifiers on June 8.

The Football Federation and the Gambian government are hoping the team will play their next home game against Mali on September 27 in Banjul. However, fans are not convinced that this is feasible given the state of the stadium.

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8th Africa Bank 4.0 Summit, concluded with an awards ceremony honoring leaders and developments within Africa https://we-are-africa.org/8th-africa-bank-4-0-summit-concluded-with-an-awards-ceremony-honoring-leaders-and-developments-within-africa/ Tue, 31 May 2022 12:52:34 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/8th-africa-bank-4-0-summit-concluded-with-an-awards-ceremony-honoring-leaders-and-developments-within-africa/ Summary: Fintech leaders present at the meeting with investors Innovation Panel Brainstorms – AI Solutions to Boost Customer Engagement CEOs of Women-Led Panels Meet Fundraising Challenges and Overcome Obstacles Retail Banking Leader’s Roundtable aims to make the retail customer experience in Africa superior, more than ever Africa Bank 4.0 Awards, recognizing the contributions of leaders […]]]>

Summary:

  • Fintech leaders present at the meeting with investors
  • Innovation Panel Brainstorms – AI Solutions to Boost Customer Engagement
  • CEOs of Women-Led Panels Meet Fundraising Challenges and Overcome Obstacles
  • Retail Banking Leader’s Roundtable aims to make the retail customer experience in Africa superior, more than ever
  • Africa Bank 4.0 Awards, recognizing the contributions of leaders and organizations in the BFSI sector in Africa.

NAIROBI, Kenya, May 30, 2022, /African Media Agency (AMA)/- 8e Africa Bank 4.0 Summit – CEO Exclusiveopened its doors to welcome the in-person participation of leaders of the African financial sector on the 25e May 2022to at Mövenpick Hotel & Residences, Nairobi – Kenya.

John Njoroge– Country Manager, Kenya | Network International (Powered Sponsor), the conference chair opened the event, which was followed by the keynote: Beyond Banking: Producing Seamless Financial Experiences through Disruptive Technologies, presented by Nandan Sea – Group CEO | International network.

Nandan SeaGroup CEO, International networkcommented: “On the 8e The Africa Bank 4.0 Summit was a great platform to discuss what the disruption means for financial services players in the region and which technologies to watch. As the leading enabler of digital commerce in Africa and the Middle East, Network International is committed to playing a central role in shaping the region’s payments landscape while helping businesses and economies in our markets thrive, simplifying commerce and payments.

INFLUENCER PANEL CEO, brainstorming about the importance of “Bringing digital banking to rural Africa”. Moderated by Faith Kobusingye Mugambwa – Regional General Manager, East Africa | Network International, panelists who joined this panel included Dr Segun Aina – President at Africa Fintech Network, Julias Alego – Chairman and CEO | Kenya Institute of Bankers and Raphael Lekolool – Managing Director | Kenya Postal Bank.

Mohammad Nana – Vice President, Fintech Partnerships, Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa | MasterCard, moderated the Leaders Innovation Panel to discuss deploying AI and automation to drive customer engagement, efficiency and productivity. Panelists joining this discussion included leaders from International Network, Sparkle, FMB Capital Holdings Plc, Jubilee Insurance and Netcore.

“How will Open Banking support financial inclusion in Africa?” was sent by Hany Fekry – Group Managing Director, Processing | International network. The latest innovative solutions and technologies in the field of customer engagement, safety and security, digital disruption, artificial intelligence were developed during exclusive presentations by the partners of the event – Netcore, Zwipe, FICO, Ameyo, IDEX Biometrics and more.

One of the sessions highlighted at the event included the PANEL OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS VOICE OF WOMEN who was addressing “How can female small business entrepreneurs overcome financing challenges and grow their businesses? »

Faith Kobusingye Mugambwa, moderated this interactive panel attended by

  • Mizinga Melu – General Manager and CEO | Absa Bank Zambia Plc
  • Grandma KALONDA – Chairman and CEO | FINCA RD Congo S
  • Caroline Kariemu-Brazell – Co-founder and Managing Director | M-Tip A
  • Djiba Diallo Senior Fintech Advisor, Operations and Technology | Ecobank Transnational Inc.

This premium edition hosted over 60 industry leaders and was sponsored by over 30 partners, including

Openway, Gupshup, Eclectics, Mastercard, Moody’s Analytics, ProgressSoft, Kenya Institute of Bankers, Africa Fintech Network, FMB Capital Holding, Centenary Bank, Sparkle, Finca among others.

The conclusion of the conference paved the way for the African Bank 4.0 Awardswhich recognized the contribution to the efforts and innovation of the region’s BFSI sector and its main players.

Commenting on the Africa Bank 4.0 awards, Nana Esi Idun – Arkhurstretail banking director Fidelity Bank Ghana Limitedexpressed her deep gratitude to the organization for nominating her “Most Influential African Banker of the Year (Retail Banking)”.

“It is an honor to be recognized for this prestigious award. This award is dedicated to each member of the Fidelity Retail team for believing in the vision and being part of the journey. This is for your commitment, diligence and phenomenal performance year after year. I am grateful to the management of the Bank for giving me the opportunity to lead and I thank my family for their unwavering support throughout my career. I want to encourage everyone, especially women, to be agents of change and excellence and to take on leadership roles in their chosen fields. Together, we can all help close the leadership gender gap.”

NMB CEO, Ruth Zaipuna said, I am delighted to accept this award on behalf of the management of NMB Bank Plc, customers and the 3,500 employees of NMB for their cooperation in providing the very best to our valued customers and shareholders and ensuring that we give back to the company in which we have supported our business for more than 20 years. »

‘I dedicate this’African Banking CEO of the Year 2022 (Tanzania)’ award to my colleagues at NMB who are fully committed to NMB’s quest to truly remain beyond comparison – a bank of innovation and customer focus, resilience, trust, safety and security,” said added Ruth.

Other industry leaders and organizations who were honored and celebrated at the awards ceremony include –

  • Abdulmajid M. Nsekela (African Retail Banker of the Year),
  • Grandma Kalonda Kapenga (African Banker of the Year in Microfinance);
  • Dr Tomisin Fashina (African Banking COO of the Year),
  • Lanre Bamisebi (African Banking CIO of the Year),
  • Unathi Mtya (Most Influential African Banker of the Year – Digital Transformation);
  • Mizinga Melu (Most Influential African Banker of the Year – Rest of Africa);
  • Asante Financial Services Group (Neobank Rising Star – East Africa);
  • Sofri Bank (Neobank Rising Star – West Africa);
  • Kenya Institute of Bankers (Outstanding Contribution to the Banking Community – Kenya);
  • African Fintech Network (Outstanding Contribution to the African FinTech Community);
  • AFiK (Outstanding Contribution to Kenya’s Fintech Community);
  • The limited leadership group (Outstanding knowledge exchange provider for the Fintech community) ChainAdvise Blockchain Consulting (Outstanding Contribution to Blockchain Development in Africa)

Solutions, products and services of IDEX Biometrics, Netcore, Eclectics, Gupshup, Ameyo and KnowBe4were recognized for their contribution in the technology and innovation categories during the awards ceremony.

Distributed by African Media Agency in partnership with BII World.

About BII World

A leading organizer who strongly believes in creating value through premium conferences and training sessions around the world. Our goal is to bring innovation and advanced development to enterprises.

Contact:

Mohor Mukherjee

Marketing events

E : [email protected]

The 8th Africa Bank 4.0 Summit, which concluded with an awards ceremony honoring leaders and developments within Africa, appeared first on African Media Agency.

Source: African Media Agency (AMA)

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Debunking QAnon’s baseless conspiracy theory that Texas school shooting was a false flag operation https://we-are-africa.org/debunking-qanons-baseless-conspiracy-theory-that-texas-school-shooting-was-a-false-flag-operation/ Fri, 27 May 2022 06:21:57 +0000 https://we-are-africa.org/debunking-qanons-baseless-conspiracy-theory-that-texas-school-shooting-was-a-false-flag-operation/ A baseless conspiracy theory is brewing in QAnon circles claiming without evidence that Tuesday’s Texas school shooting was a false flag attack. The ridiculous claims began spreading across Telegram groups hours after the attack, with QAnon influencers weighing in on the massacre which claimed the lives of at least 21 people, including 19 children. The […]]]>

A baseless conspiracy theory is brewing in QAnon circles claiming without evidence that Tuesday’s Texas school shooting was a false flag attack.

The ridiculous claims began spreading across Telegram groups hours after the attack, with QAnon influencers weighing in on the massacre which claimed the lives of at least 21 people, including 19 children.

The Poynter Institute and Politifact have denied false claims that the shooting was staged. However, that hasn’t stopped QAnon influencers from casting doubt on the tragedy.

QAnon John, now known as “The Ultra Patriot Voice”, posted to his Telegram group hours after the shooting, drawing attention to what he baselessly claimed to be “an endless amount of false flags and mass shootings” in Texas. He claimed that “dreams of gun-grabbing fever” cause people to attempt to ban guns “through fear and force”.

“Does America have the rocks to call it that? False flag fire to take our guns. Child sacrifice is part of the agenda and a means to the end. It is SICK #uvaldeshooting,” Vandersteel wrote.

“You don’t think this was done to demonize Texas Republicans and the NRA? said the anonymous caller.

“It’s very suspicious timing,” Jones said, wondering how the shooter got “all that money” to buy his guns.

Jones then suggested that everyone should be able to question the attack “because there were so many false flags, so many provocative operations”.

According to The New York Times, there were also social media posts claiming that some parents affected by the shooting did not appear emotional enough in the news clips and were crisis actors.

The false allegation originated from the 4chan messaging forum and involved photos of three trans women shared without their consent in an attempt to substantiate these false claims.

The Texas massacre was not the first time a mass shooting sparked wild conspiracy theories.

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